Overseas Civilian Contractors

News and issues relating to Civilian Contractors working Overseas

US Gov contractors have 20 days to get those illegal workers out of Iraq!

July 23, 2010 Ms Sparky

According to a recent memo to ALL CONTRACTORS IN IRAQ from COL Nolan of the Centcom Contracting Command, ALL contractors in Iraq have 20 days to repatriate (send home) third country nationals who’s countries prohibit travel to Iraq. This includes among others, the Philippines and Nepal.

OMG!! This will affect virtually every service KBR provides the DoD in Iraq. I would guess there are 1000′s of Filipino workers who work in the Dining Facilities (DFAC’s), in the Laundries, drive trucks and shuttle buses, craftspeople and laborers. I would suspect there are direct hire Filipinos as well as Filipinos who work for KBR subcontractors such as PPI and Serka who were evidently smuggled in most likely from countries like Jordan or Turkey.

I hope the DCMA will write Corrective Action Requests (CARs) if services suffer. KBR as well as every other contractor in Iraq had to know about the Iraq travel restrictions of the Filipinos. It only made sense the the Filipinos were being smuggled in therefore violating Philippine and Iraqi law.

This will take definitely put a kink in the illicit sex trafficking and trade in Iraq…..for a little while anyway. And I do hope these contractors don’t just dump these workers on the border somewhere and leave them like they have been leaving them stranded in Iraq.

On a positive note, in the midst of a huge Reduction In Force in Iraq, it may make room for more Americans to stay and work on DoD contracts.

I don’t want to be unappreciative of what appears to be very strong action on the part of the DoD, but I do have to ask….”What took you so long?”  Original at MsSparky

July 23, 2010 Posted by | Civilian Contractors, KBR, Legal Jurisdictions | , , , , , , | 1 Comment

VA creates new registry for soldiers exposed to hexavalent chromium in Iraq

By Julie Sullivan at The Oregonian

The Department of Veterans Affairs is launching a Qarmat Ali registry to aggressively track and treat veterans exposed to a cancer-causing chemical in Iraq in 2003.

The national surveillance program will register hundreds of National Guard members who served at the Qarmat Ali water- treatment plant, looking for health problems associated with hexavalent chromium exposure, such as asthma and lung cancer.

The monitoring is a victory for nearly 300 Oregon Army National Guard members and for Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore. Wyden proposed such a registry March 22 after veterans with breathing and skin problems told him in an emotional meeting in Portland that VA staff did not understand the hazards of their assignment.

“This is a concrete step forward,” Wyden said. “But it is only a step.” He wants the VA to go further and presume a service connection that will increase access and benefits.

The program is more a medical monitoring program than a confirmation of health problems. The VA does not presume a veteran who served at Qarmat Ali is ill — nor that any specific diseases are linked to serving there.

But the Qarmat Ali Medical Surveillance program will standardize medical exams nationwide, focusing doctors’ attention on lung cancer and other related problems and help direct treatment. Among the steps: ear, nose, throat, lung and skin exams as well as regular chest X-rays, said Dr. Victoria Cassano, director of radiation and physical exposure for the VA’s Office of Public Health and Environmental HazardsRead the entire story here

July 23, 2010 Posted by | Civilian Contractors, Contractor Casualties, KBR, Pentagon, Toxic | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment