Overseas Civilian Contractors

News and issues relating to Civilian Contractors working Overseas

The rise of the UK’s private security companies

Major General Graham Binns is not your typical chief executive.

As a lifelong soldier, he is more used to commanding an armoured division than a company boardroom.

In 2003 he commanded British troops invading southern Iraq, and in 2007 returned as the commander of British forces overseeing the handover of Basra to the Iraqis.

But now, four months into his new job as chief executive of Aegis Defence Services – a British private security company (PSC) – he has left army life behind.

“It’s liberating,” he says, sitting in Aegis’s comfortable headquarters in a plush office building in central London.

“Thirty-five years in government service was a wonderful experience. But in the world of business, ex-military people have got a lot to offer – I certainly hope so anyway.”

For Aegis, netting a leading figure from the Iraq war can only be good for business – particularly when your business is in the often-controversial world of armed private security.

Now one of the UK’s biggest PSCs, Aegis has made millions from the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan since it was founded just eight years ago.

Iraq bubble

“It’s liberating,” he says, sitting in Aegis’s comfortable headquarters in a plush office building in central London.

“Thirty-five years in government service was a wonderful experience. But in the world of business, ex-military people have got a lot to offer – I certainly hope so anyway.”

For Aegis, netting a leading figure from the Iraq war can only be good for business – particularly when your business is in the often-controversial world of armed private security.

Now one of the UK’s biggest PSCs, Aegis has made millions from the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan since it was founded just eight years ago.

Please read the full story here

November 2, 2010 Posted by | Aegis, Civilian Contractors, Private Security Contractor | , , , | Leave a comment

Bodies of 2 aid workers discovered in Afghanistan

Kabul, Afghanistan (CNN) The bodies of two female aid workers were discovered Sunday morning in Afghanistan’s Helmand province, a spokesman for Helmand’s governor told CNN on Tuesday.

Daud Ahmadi said one of the women was the founder of the organization Mahjoba Herawi, an Afghan non-governmental organization. Ahmadi said both were working on women-oriented projects such as jam and pasta making.

The women’s driver disappeared, and it was unclear whether robbers or the Taliban killed the women, Ahmadi said.

The deaths come after a British aid worker held hostage in eastern Afghanistan was killed by her captors during an October rescue attempt.

Linda Norgrove, 36, worked for DAI, an international humanitarian group. U.S. military officials have said investigations were underway to determine whether Norgrove was killed by a grenade thrown by American forces trying to free her.

Also in southern Afghanistan, a NATO-led service member died after an insurgent attack, NATO’s International Security Assistance Force said. The force did not identify the nationality of the service member or precisely where the incident occurred.

November 2, 2010 Posted by | Afghanistan, Civilian Contractors, NGO's | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Yemeni Accused of Killing French Contractor at OMV Offices Goes on Trial

Yemeni Accused of Killing French Contractor at OMV Offices Goes on Trial

Bloomberg

A Yemeni teenager went on trial for killing a French contractor at the local office of Austria’s OMV AG, and denied charges he carried out the assault following the directives of a militant cleric.

Yemen’s state security court today said Hisham Mohammed Asem, 19, a security guard at OMV, had e-mail correspondence with Anwar al-Awlaki, a Yemeni-American cleric who supports violence against U.S. targets.

The contractor killed last month worked for Spie Batignolles SA, a French construction company, according to the French foreign ministry. Another British contractor was injured in the attack.

Yemen put al-Awlaki on trial in absentia today on charges of incitement to murder foreigners, citing the OMV attack. Al- Awlaki is believed by the U.S. to have links with al-Qaeda militants including three of the people who carried out the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks in the U.S., Yemen’s state-owned news agency Saba reported today. It said al-Awlaki will be tried in Yemen if he’s captured, not extradited to the U.S.

November 2, 2010 Posted by | Civilian Contractors, Contractor Casualties, Yemen | , , | Leave a comment