Overseas Civilian Contractors

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Monitoring Responsibilities for Serious Incidents Involving Private Security Contractors Once U.S. Military Forces Leave Iraq Have Not Been Determined (SIGIR 11-019)

LETTER FOR SECRETARY OF STATE      July 29, 2011
                  U.S. AMBASSADOR TO IRAQ
                  SECRETARY OF DEFENSE
                  COMMANDER, U.S. CENTRAL COMMAND
                  COMMANDING GENERAL, U.S. FORCES–IRAQ

Monitoring Responsibilities for Serious Incidents Involving Private Security  Contractors Once U.S. Military Forces Leave Iraq Have Not Been Determined     (SIGIR 11-019)

In September 2007, Blackwater, Inc., a private security contractor (PSC) under contract with the
Department of State (DoS), was involved in an incident that resulted in the death of 17 Iraqi
civilians.  As a result of the incident and its repercussions, the Department of Defense (DoD) and
DoS took actions to improve their coordination and oversight of PSCs involved in serious
incidents.1   In April 2009, the Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction (SIGIR)

reported on the DoD system for reporting, investigating, and remediating serious incidents
involving PSCs in Iraq.2      Because of the planned withdrawal of U.S. military forces from Iraq in

December 2011, SIGIR reviewed the U.S. government’s current and planned oversight of PSCs
in that country.  In April 2011, SIGIR reported on the relationship between the U.S. Army Corps
of Engineers’ Gulf Region District’s reconstruction activities and its security contract
requirements with Aegis Defense Services, Limited.3

SIGIR’s objectives for this report were to determine (1) changes in the serious incident reporting
and investigating system since SIGIR’s 2009 report, (2) plans for the system after U.S. military
forces leave Iraq, and (3) coordination of serious incidents with the Government of Iraq (GOI).
SIGIR also followed up on the status of recommendations in its April 2009 report.  SIGIR will
be issuing separate reports on the current status of those recommendations.

SIGIR performed this audit under the authority of Public Law 108-106, as amended, which also
incorporates the duties and responsibilities of inspectors general under the Inspector General Act
of 1978 and in furtherance of a mandate in Section 842 of the National Defense Authorization
Act for 2008, Public Law 110-181, pertaining to contracts for the performance of security and
reconstruction functions in Iraq.      SIGIR encountered significant constraints imposed by DoS’
Bureau of Diplomatic Security.  The Bureau was unresponsive to SIGIR’s requests for

1 According to DoD guidance a serious incident includes, but is not limited to, “any damage of equipment or injury

to persons, attacks, any weapons discharge, criminal acts, traffic accidents, incidents involving ISF [Iraqi Security
Forces] and any incident believed to have possible strategic or operational impact. Incidents where aggressive
personal behavior and share the road policies are violated shall be reported.”
2  Opportunities To Improve Processes for Reporting, Investigating, and Remediating Serious Incidents Involving

Private Security Contractors in Iraq, SIGIR 09-019, 4/30/2009.
3  Gulf Region District Is Adjusting Its Aegis Security Contract Requirements for Changes in Reconstruction

Activities in Iraq, SIGIR 11-015, 4/27/2011.

July 31, 2011 - Posted by | Civilian Contractors, Contractor Oversight, Iraq, Legal Jurisdictions, Private Security Contractor, SIGIR | , , , ,

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