Overseas Civilian Contractors

News and issues relating to Civilian Contractors working Overseas

Two British Civilian Contractors killed worked for Fluor

Scotsman October 31, 2011

The British contractors were named locally as Stephen Brown, 52, and David Quinn, 34Both men were electricians, employed by the Texas-based engineering company Fluor. Their bodies were due to be repatriated last night. “The company has notified the families involved,” said Fluor spokesman Keith Stephens. “Our thoughts and prayers are with the family, friends and loved ones of our co-workers. Right now our focus is helping them.”

The British contractors were working for the Texas-based construction and engineering firm Fluor, which has extensive contracts with Nato forces in Afghanistan, including managing essential facilities on army bases all over the country.

Fluor Corp., a company based in Irving, Texas, that employs contractors in Afghanistan, confirmed on Sunday that some of its employees, including the two British nationals, were killed in the attack. Their names were not being released out of respect for their families, said Keith Stephens, a company representative.

British contractors among victims of Kabul convoy attack  October 30, 2011

Two British civilians were among 17 people killed in a Taliban car bomb attack on a military convoy in Kabul on Saturday.

The two electricians, who have not been named, were travelling in a heavily armoured Rhino bus in the western outskirts of the Afghan capital when the vehicle was rammed by a Toyota Corolla believed to have been carrying 700kg of explosives.

Four US soldiers, five US civilians, a Canadian soldier, a Kosovan civilian were killed as well. Four Afghan civilians near the scene also died in the blast, which smashed windows in buildings up to half a kilometre away.

The British contractors were working for the Texas-based construction and engineering firm Fluor, which has extensive contracts with Nato forces in Afghanistan, including managing essential facilities on army bases all over the country.

One of the bodies has already been flown out of Afghanistan, a western official said, while the second was due to be flown out on Sunday after a ceremony at Bagram air field, to the north of Kabul, which was due to be attended by senior military officers and diplomats.

It is not known which project the men had been working on, but it is thought that the bus – which was being escorted by other armoured vehicles – had just left the counter-insurgency school run by Nato at Camp Julien in the west of the city and was heading for Camp Phoenix, a US base involved in training Afghan soldiers and policemen.

October 30, 2011 Posted by | Afghanistan, Civilian Contractors, Contractor Casualties, Fluor | , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Marine EOD Staff Sergeant Stephen J Dunning killed in Afghanistan

Milpitas Marine Awarded Purple Heart, Was Killed Disarming Bomb

Marine Staff Sgt. Stephen J. Dunning, 31, of Milpitas, has received a posthumous Purple Heart. Dunning is a graduate of Milpitas HIgh School.

Marine Staff Sgt. Stephen J. Dunning, 31, of Milpitas, was killed Thursday in Afghanistan.

The U.S. Department of Defense said Dunning was an explosive ordinance disposal technician, and was killed while attempting to disarm an explosive device in the Helmand province when he was killed.

Dunning has been awarded a posthumous Purple Heart.

During his career, he also collected many other service awards, including the Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal, Combat Action Ribbon, Navy Unit Commendation, Navy Meritorious Unit Commendation, Good Conduct Medal, Afghanistan Campaign Medal, Sea Service Deployment Ribbon, National Defense Service Medal, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, Korean Defense Service Medal, and the NATO Medal-ISAF Afghanistan. He also received two letters of appreciation and a certificate of commendation, individual award.

Dunning joined the Marine Corps on April 19, 1999. At the time of his death, he was assigned to the 9th Engineer Support Battalion, 3rd Marine Logistics Group, III Marine Expeditionary Force, which is normally based in Okinawa, Japan, where he had been serving since June of 2009. His unit was recently sent to Afghanistan to support Operation Enduring Freedom

Memorial Service Planned

October 30, 2011 Posted by | Afghanistan, Explosive Ordnance Disposal, Improvised Explosive Devices | , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Former Australian soldier and Private Security Contractor Gary Peters helps Gaddafi’s son Saadi escape Libya

A FORMER Australian soldier working as a private security contractor has admitted he helped Muammar Gaddafi’s son, Saadi, flee Libya last month.

Courier Mail

Saadi’s longtime bodyguard, Gary Peters, has told Canada’s National Post that he was part of a team that drove Gaddafi’s third son across Libya’s southern border to Niger.

Mr Peters, now a permanent resident of Canada, returned to Toronto in September, suffering from an untreated bullet wound to his left shoulder received when the convoy was ambushed after crossing back into Libya.

“I’m not a mercenary,” Mr Peters told the Post, which said his account had been verified by several sources.

“I work for a person in particular, have done for years, for close protection. When we go overseas, I don’t fight. That’s what a mercenary does. Defend? Yes. Shoot? Yes. But for defence, for my boss, and that’s what happened. The convoy got attacked and two of us got hit.”

Mr Peters said he had provided security services to Gaddafi family members since 2004, and continued to do so during NATO’s campaign to oust the late dictator.

Though he worked mostly for Saadi, he also guarded Gaddafi’s other sons, Seif al-Islam and Hannibal, and said he had escorted Hannibal and his sister Aisha from Libya to Algeria in a convoy.

Mr Peters said he first met Saadi while serving in the Australian Army. Gaddafi’s son was visiting the 2000 summer Olympics in Sydney and Mr Peters was assigned to protect him.

After moving to Canada in 2002, Mr Peters said he worked “on and off” for the next two years as a close protection operative for security contractor Blackwater USA, which was barred from Iraq over a deadly 2007 shooting and later renamed Xe Services

Please read more here

October 30, 2011 Posted by | Africa, Civilian Contractors, Libya, Private Security Contractor | , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

2 British civilians among those killed in suicide bombing of NATO convoy in Kabul

By Associated Press at Washington Post, Updated: Sunday, October 30, 9:41 AM

KABUL, Afghanistan — Britain’s Foreign Office says two British civilians working for a building contractor were among the victims of a weekend suicide bombing of a NATO convoy in Kabul that killed 17.

A Taliban suicide bomber rammed a vehicle loaded with explosives into an armored NATO bus on a busy thoroughfare in Kabul on Saturday, killing five NATO service members, including one Canadian soldier, eight civilian contractors and four Afghans.

Earlier it was reported that the five soldiers and eight contractors killed were all American.

The British ministry said Sunday that the families of the two civilians have been informed.

Please read more here

October 30, 2011 Posted by | Civilian Contractors, Contractor Casualties | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Three Australians killed seven wounded by rogue ally in Afghanistan

Aussies slain by rogue ally in Afghanistan

THREE Australian soldiers and their interpreter have been murdered by a “rogue” Afghan army soldier who opened fire with a machine gun on a dozen Australians, leaving seven wounded including one critically.

The Daily Telegraph   October 31, 2011

Two of the three died instantly following a weekly parade at Forward Operating Base Pacemaker in northern Kandahar Province at 8.30am local time on Saturday.

The third was pronounced dead after he was flown to the Role Two field hospital at Tarin Kowt.

It is understood the men were not wearing body armour or helmets because they were inside a secure base.

The victims of the deadliest attack yet against Australian forces were a 26-year-old married captain with no children, a 27-year-old lance corporal with three young children from Townsville and a 22-year-old Brisbane-based corporal whose brother is also serving in Afghanistan.

Their families yesterday declined to release names and photos because some relatives had not been notified.

Please read more here

October 30, 2011 Posted by | Afghanistan, Safety and Security Issues | , , | Leave a comment

Eight American Civilian Contractors killed in Suicide Car Blast Afghanistan

 

 

 

Fluor Corp., a company based in Irving, Texas, that employs contractors in Afghanistan, confirmed on Sunday that some of its employees, including the two British nationals, were killed in the attack. Their names were not being released out of respect for their families, said Keith Stephens, a company representative.

12 Americans Die as Blast Hits Bus in Afghanistan

KABUL, Afghanistan — At least 12 Americans were killed when a Taliban suicide car bomber attacked an armored shuttle bus in Kabul on Saturday, military officials said.

The bombing was the single deadliest assault on Americans in the capital since the war began, military officials said, and follows brazen Taliban attacks on the American Embassy and NATO headquarters in the city last month.

A Western defense official said at least four of the dead Americans were G.I.’s and the rest were contract workers; a Canadian soldier and four Afghans were also reported to be killed.

The attack Saturday and the other high-profile assaults are seen as a shift in Taliban strategy as the militants struggle against a surge in American troops that has loosened their grip on the Taliban heartland in the south and compromised their ability to stage more conventional attacks on NATO forces.

American officials see the latest assaults as the Taliban’s attempt to shake confidence in the Afghan government, which has been taking over security from NATO in Kabul and other areas of the country

Read more here

October 30, 2011 Posted by | Afghanistan, Civilian Contractors, Contractor Casualties, Safety and Security Issues | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment