Overseas Civilian Contractors

News and issues relating to Civilian Contractors working Overseas

Contractors in War Zones: Not Exactly “Contracting”

There are more contractors than troops in Afghanistan

Time’s Battleland  October 9, 2012 by David Isenberg

U.S. military forces may be out of Iraq, but the unsung and unrecognized part of America’s modern military establishment is still serving and sacrificing — the role played by private military and security contractors.

That their work is dangerous can be seen by looking at the headlines. Just last Thursday a car bomb hit a private security convoy in Baghdad, killing four people and wounding at least nine others.

That is hardly an isolated incident. According to the most recent Department of Labor statistics there were at least 121 civilian contractor deaths filed on in the third quarter of 2012. Of course, these included countries besides Iraq.

As the Defense Base Act Compensation blog notes, “these numbers are not an accurate accounting of Contractor Casualties as many injuries and deaths are not reported as Defense Base Act Claims. Also, many of these injuries will become deaths due to the Defense Base Act Insurance Companies denial of medical benefits.” To date, a total of 90,680 claims have been filed since September 1, 2001.

How many contractors are now serving on behalf of the U.S. government?

According to the most recent quarterly contractor census report issued by the U.S. Central Command, which includes both Iraq and Afghanistan, as well as 18 other countries stretching from Egypt to Kazakhstan, there were approximately 137,000 contractors working for the Pentagon in its region. There were 113,376 in Afghanistan and 7,336 in Iraq. Of that total, 40,110 were U.S. citizens, 50,560 were local hires, and 46,231 were from neither the U.S. not the country in which they were working.

Put simply, there are more contractors than U.S. troops in Afghanistan.

These numbers, however, do not reflect the totality of contractors. For example, they do not include contractors working for the U.S. State Department. The CENTCOM report says that “of FY 2012, the USG contractor population in Iraq will be approximately 13.5K.  Roughly half of these contractors are employed under Department of State contracts.”

While most of the public now understands that contractors perform a lot of missions once done by troops – peeling potatoes, pulling security — they may not realize just how dependent on them the Pentagon has become.

Please read the entire post here

October 9, 2012 - Posted by | Afghanistan, Civilian Contractors, Contractor Casualties, Contractor Oversight, Defense Base Act, Department of Defense, Iraq, KBR, Private Military Contractors, Private Security Contractor, State Department, Wartime Contracting | , , , , , , , , , , ,

1 Comment »

  1. AFGHAN GOV TO U.S.: FIRE ANHAM.THE LAND MAFIA
    “ANHAM IS THE LAND MAFIA, STEALING OUR FARMING LAND. ILLEGALLY CONSTRUCTING FACILITIES. COMPLAINT FILED WITH US MILITARY AUTHORITIES WENT UNANSWERED.” (AFGHAN GOVERNMENT OFFICIAL TO KABUL NEWSPAPER)

    October 10, 2012—Kabul’s major newspaper has published today, a major article including a copy of a public formal letter and plea to US Military Authorities to fire Anham USA, major food and supply defense logistics contractor, that supports Defense Logistics Agency. According to the newspaper, the head of the National Economy Committee Chair, implores the US Government to “STOP ANHAM” and suspend its operations as he accuses them of stealing lands.

    Publishing Date: October 10, 2012
    Source: http://armanemili.com/detail.php?pid=1208

    Comment by jasminejonhston | October 14, 2012 | Reply


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