Overseas Civilian Contractors

News and issues relating to Civilian Contractors working Overseas

Canadian man and American woman kidnapped in Wardak

Khaama Press  October 12, 2012

According to reports two foreign nationals were abducted by unknown gunmen in central Maidan Wardak province of Afghanistan.

A local security official speaking on the condition of anonymity said the two individuals were kidnapped in Syedabad district.

The source further added the two individuals including a Canadian Man and an American woman were civilians.

They were kidnapped while they were on their way from eastern Ghazni province to capital Kabul.

No group including the Taliban militants has so far claimed responsibility behind the incident.

Afghan government officials yet to comment regarding the report.

Please see the original and read more here

October 12, 2012 Posted by | Afghanistan, Civilian Contractors, Contractors Kidnapped, Contractors Missing | , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Iraq convoy was sent out despite threat

Unarmored trucks carrying needed supplies were ambushed, leaving six drivers dead. Records illuminate the fateful decision.

“Can anyone explain to me why we put civilians in the middle of known ambush sites?”

“Maybe we should put body bags on the packing list for our drivers.”

T Christian Miller The LA Times  September 3, 2007

Senior managers for defense contractor KBR overruled calls to halt supply operations in Iraq in the spring of 2004, ordering unarmored trucks into an active combat zone where six civilian drivers died in an ambush, according to newly available documents.

Company e-mails and other internal communications reveal that before KBR dispatched the convoy, a chorus of security advisors predicted an increase in roadside bombings and attacks on Iraq’s highways. They recommended suspension of convoys.

“[I] think we will get people injured or killed tomorrow,” warned KBR regional security chief George Seagle, citing “tons of intel.” But in an e-mail sent a day before the convoy was dispatched, he also acknowledged: “Big politics and contract issues involved.”

KBR was under intense pressure from the military to deliver on its multibillion-dollar contract to transport food, fuel and other vital supplies to U.S. soldiers. At Baghdad’s airport, a shortage of jet fuel threatened to ground some units.

After consulting with military commanders, KBR’s top managers decided to keep the convoys rolling. “If the [Army] pushes, then we push, too,” wrote an aide to Craig Peterson, KBR’s top official in Iraq.

The decision prompted a raging internal debate that is detailed in private KBR documents, some under court seal, that were reviewed by The Times.

One KBR management official threatened to resign when superiors ordered truckers to continue driving. “I cannot consciously sit back and allow unarmed civilians to get picked apart,” wrote Keith Richard, chief of the trucking operation.

Six American truck drivers and two U.S. soldiers were killed when the convoy rumbled into a five-mile gauntlet of weapons fire on April 9, 2004, making an emergency delivery of jet fuel to the airport. One soldier and a seventh trucker remain missing.

Recriminations began the same day.

“Can anyone explain to me why we put civilians in the middle of known ambush sites?” demanded one security advisor in an e-mail. “Maybe we should put body bags on the packing list for our drivers.”

Please read the entire story here

October 9, 2012 Posted by | Civilian Contractors, Contractor Casualties, Contractor Oversight, Contractors Missing, Defense Base Act, Department of Defense, Follow the Money, Halliburton, Iraq, KBR, Lawsuits, Politics, Private Military Contractors, Safety and Security Issues, Wartime Contracting | , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Tierney and Cummings Seek Administration Help on Legislation to Save Taxpayers Billions on Defense Base Act Insurance

“IT”S TIME TO FIX THIS PROGRAM”

Washington, DC (Sept. 11, 2012)— September 17, 2012

Today, Rep. Elijah E. Cummings, Ranking Member of the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, and Rep. John F. Tierney, Ranking Member of the Subcommittee on National Security, Homeland Defense and Foreign Operations, sent a letter to the Office of Management and Budget requesting support for, and input on, H.R. 5891, The Defense Base Act Insurance Improvement Act of 2012.

“This is a common-sense bill that would save the American taxpayers billions of dollars,” said Tierney. “Numerous government audits have concluded that we are paying too much for workers’ compensation insurance for overseas government contractors, and that these workers aren’t getting what they deserve. It’s time to fix this program.”

The legislation would transition the existing Defense Base Act (DBA) insurance program to a government self-insurance program. According to a 2009 Pentagon study, this change could save as much as $250 million a year. The study found: “In the long run, the self-insurance alternative may have the greatest potential for minimizing DBA insurance costs, and it has several administrative and compliance advantages as well.”

“We are sponsoring this legislation because several audits of the current DBA program have documented enormous unnecessary costs incurred by taxpayers,” Cummings and Tierney wrote.

The existing system has been a boondoggle for private insurance companies, which have reaped enormous profits under the program. According to an Oversight Committee investigation, insurance companies providing DBA insurance in Iraq and Afghanistan have made enormous underwriting profits that are significantly higher than those of traditional workers’ compensation insurers.

The letter from Tierney and Cummings requests support for the legislation and notes that “OMB may be evaluating similar options.”

September 18, 2012 Posted by | Afghanistan, AIG and CNA, Civilian Contractors, Contractor Casualties, Contractors Kidnapped, Contractors Missing, Defense Base Act, Department of Defense, Follow the Money, Private Military Contractors, Private Security Contractor | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Two Foreign Doctors and Three Afghans kidnapped in NE Afghanistan

Officials: 2 foreigners, 3 Afghans abducted
May 23, 2012 07:08 GMT

KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — Officials say two foreign doctors and three of their Afghan colleagues have been kidnapped in a remote area in the extreme northeast Afghanistan.

Abdul Maroof Rasikh, the spokesman for the governor of Badakhshan province, said on Wednesday that it’s unclear who kidnapped the five. He says the kidnapping occurred Tuesday as the group was traveling on horseback between Yaftal and Ragh districts about 90 kilometers (56 miles) from the provincial capital of Faizabad.

He says the five were employed by a non-profit humanitarian organization, which reported the kidnapping.

Neither the name of the organization or the identities of the five who were abducted have been released.

A police official and the deputy governor also confirmed the kidnapping.

May 23, 2012 Posted by | Afghanistan, Civilian Contractors, Contractors Kidnapped, Contractors Missing, Humanitarian Assistance, NGO's, Safety and Security Issues | , , , | Leave a comment

At Least 49 Civilian Contractor Deaths filed on in First Quarter 2012

WE ARE THE BEST KEPT SECRET OF THE WARS

According to the Department of Labor’s Defense Base Act Claim Summary Reports there were at least 49 Civilian Contractor Deaths filed on in the first quarter of 2012.

Keep in mind that these numbers are not an accurate accounting of Contractor Casualties as many injuries and deaths are not reported as Defense Base Act Claims.  Also, many of these injuries will become deaths due to the Defense Base Act Insurance Companies denial of medical benefits.

Many foreign national and local national contractors and their families are never told that they are covered under the Defense Base Act and so not included in the count.

At least 2, 580 Defense Base Act Claims were filed during this quarter

At least  49 were death claims

(3  reported for Iraq compared to 1 coalition,  36 for Afghanistan compared to 97 coalition, Kuwait 2, UAE 1, Columbia 1, Nation Pending 2)

At least 1008 were for injuries requiring longer than 4 days off work

At least 196 were for injuries requiring less than 4 day off work

At least 1433 were for injuries requiring no time off of work

A total of 84, 820 Defense Base Act Claims have been filed since September 1, 2001

Contact dbacasualty@yahoo.com for questions regarding these numbers

Any casualties that we were able to identify can be found under the Contractor Casualties Category

April 13, 2012 Posted by | Civilian Contractors, Contractor Casualties, Contractors Missing, Defense Base Act | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Helpers in a hostile world: the risk of aid work grows

Some 242 aid workers were killed in 2010, up from 91 a decade before. Is ‘humanitarian space’ shrinking, or are aid groups spreading out to more conflict zones than before?

Christian Science Monitor February 10, 2012

American contractor Greg Ock recounts how he was kidnapped, while driving to the clinic where he works, and held hostage in Nigeria. John Bazemore/AP

Aid workers may be an idealistic sort, but they’re not naive. They know the risks of crossing oceans or pressing through to remote areas to build tent cities, run feeding stations, or treat the sick in what are by definition the most dangerous and least hospitable corners of the planet.

In the decade since Sept. 11, those risks have only increased as members of the US military and other government agencies have joined the ranks of those doing humanitarian aid work.

In 2010, some 242 aid workers were killed, up from 91 a decade before, according to a survey by Humanitarian Outcomes, underscoring how many attacks on aid workers have become intentional, rather than a side effect of war. It’s an environment in which the Navy SEALs may be called upon for help, as they were in the recent rescue of two aid workers from the grip of Somali kidnapping gangs.

Yet while individual cases – in a Yemeni town, a region of Sudan, a district of Somalia – may give the impression that aid groups are on the retreat, the reverse is true. Humanitarian aid budgets by donor nations have grown 10-fold between 1998 and 2008. And while the work has become much more dangerous, aid workers are honing their ability to negotiate with unsavory regimes and find new paths to achieve traditional humanitarian goals.

Among the first aid groups to go into conflict zones or disaster areas, and the last to leave, is Doctors Without Borders, known primarily by its French name, Médecins Sans Frontières. But even MSF has had its staffers expelled from Sudan and Sri Lanka and pulled its staff from aid camps in some of the neediest sections of Somalia and the northern Kenyan border because of attacks in recent years.

Please read the entire story here

February 10, 2012 Posted by | Civilian Contractors, Contractor Casualties, Contractors Held, Contractors Kidnapped, Contractors Missing, Humanitarian Assistance, Safety and Security Issues | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Americans Missing, Left Behind in Iraq

“Basically, the mentality of the Secretary of State seems to be that if the

States loses a member of the United States military,

then the loss becomes a relevant statistic on the ‘War on Terror,’

but when the United States loses a contractor . . .

then there is no accounting for the loss of life. . . .

As a result, the true cost in lives and money

of the ‘War on Terror’ is understated.”

from Joshua Munns case

While the DPMO shows only 4 Americans left behind in Iraq

Missing in Action: Service Members and Civilian Contractors left behind

Susie Dow at The Missing Man has compiled a list which includes 18 Americans left behind, the majority of those being Civilian Contractors

Below is a chart showing the name, incident date, an expired link to an incident report (SIGACT), and status of those Americans known to be missing and/or held hostage in Iraq in table format. The chart shows an estimated 18 missing Americans of whom, the names of 6 are unknown. An additional 2 American’s names are known but the date of incident is not.

Text of available SIGACT reports are posted at SIGACT Reports of Americans Missing in Iraq.

Americans Missing in Iraq – as of January 21, 2012

Names missing from the chart below: Hussain al-Zurufi and Bob Hamze

Date Name – incident report Status
1 Oct 9, 2003 Kirk von Ackermann missing 1
2 Apr 9, 2004 Thomas Hamill (link expired)  Convoy Attack escaped
3 Apr 9, 2004 Nicholas Evan Berg deceased
4 Apr 9, 2004 William Bradley deceased
5 Apr 9, 2004 Pfc Keith Matthew Maupin deceased
6 Apr 9, 2004 Timothy E Bell  Story of Convoy Attack missing 2
7 May 3, 2004 Aban Elias missing 3
8 Aug 13, 2004 Micah Garen released
9 Sept 16, 2004 Jack Henlsey deceased
10 Sept 16, 2004 Olin Eugene Armstrong Jr deceased
11 Oct 10, 2004 Paul Taggart released
12 Nov 1, 2004 Roy Hallums released
13 Nov 2, 2004 Dean Sadek missing 4
14 Apr 11, 2005 Jeffrey Ake missing 5
15 May 17, 2005 Neenus Y. Khoshaba – incident? missing 6
16 Aug 2, 2005 Steven Charles Vincent deceased
17 Sept 27, 2005 Abbas Kareem Naama (Tim) missing 7
18 Nov 25, 2005 Ronald Alan Schulz deceased
19 Nov 26, 2005 Thomas William Fox deceased
20 Dec 2, 2005 unknown #1 missing 8
21 Jan 7, 2006 Jill Carroll released
22 Jun 16, 2006 Pfc Kristian Menchaca deceased
23 Jun 16, 2006 Pfc Thomas Tucker deceased
24 Oct 23, 2006 Sgt Ahmed Qusai al-Taayie missing 9
25 Nov 16, 2006 Jonathon Michael Cote deceased
26 Nov 16, 2006 Paul Christopher Johnson-Reuben deceased
27 Nov 16, 2006 Joshua Mark Munns deceased
28 Nov 16, 2006 John Roy Young deceased
29 Nov 27, 2006 Maj Troy Lee Gilbert (deceased) missing 10
30 Jan 5, 2007 Ronald J Withrow deceased
31 Jan 27, 2007 unknown #2 – incident? missing 11
32 Jan 27, 2007 unknown #3 – incident? missing 12
33 Feb 1, 2007 unknown #4 Iraqi-American missing 13
34 Mar 3, 2007 Adnan al-Hilawi missing 14
35 Apr 25, 2007 unknown #5 missing 15
36 May 12, 2007 Sgt Alex Ramon Jimenez deceased
37 May 12, 2007 Pfc Byron W Fouty deceased
38 May 25, 2007 unknown #6 missing 16
39 Aug 17, 2007 unknown #7 missing 17
40 summer 2008 unknown #8 missing 18
41 May 21, 2009 Jim Kitterman deceased
42 Jan 23, 2010 Issa T Salomi released

February 10, 2012 Posted by | Civilian Contractors, Contractor Casualties, Contractors Missing, Defense Base Act, Iraq, Private Military Contractors, Private Security Contractor | , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Missing in action: Service members and Contractors left behind

The DPMO website cites 4 men as missing – see below. And yet, other contractors are known to still be missing.

Kirk von Ackermann

More than five years later, Altaie’s case remains unsolved and has been turned over to the missing personnel office, along with those of three missing defense contractors: Kirk Von Ackermann, lost since 2003; Timothy Bell, lost since 2004; and Adnan al-Hilawi, lost since 2007

See also Gulf War II Operation Iraqi Freedom at POW Network

Politico February 9, 2012

With U.S. combat troops out of Iraq and a time frame for a pullout set in Afghanistan, an ominous question looms: Who will we have left behind?

In Iraq, at least one U.S. service member is currently listed as missing, along with three defense contractors. And in Afghanistan, an Army sergeant is believed to be captured by the Taliban.

“Even if there’s only one, that’s one too many,” said Rep. Peter King (R-N.Y.), who for years has advocated better accounting of America’s lost service members.

Since 1993, King, chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee and a member of the House Intelligence Committee, has been pushing for legislation that would establish a panel to investigate the handling of missing-in-action and prisoner-of-war cases from past conflicts. The latest iteration of his bill is stalled in the House Rules Committee.

King is especially concerned about World War II, the Korean War and the Vietnam War, which together claim more than 83,000 unaccounted-for U.S. service members, according to the Defense Prisoner of War/Missing Personnel Office.

“It’s never been the political issue during either of the Iraq wars or in Afghanistan the way it was in Vietnam,” he said in an interview with POLITICO. “It was such an emotional issue for so many Vietnam veterans, and I believed a full investigation was required.”

Asked why his bill hasn’t gained traction, King said Pentagon officials oppose it. “They feel it would open up too many sensitive records,” he explained. “I feel that there are enough serious questions that they should be opened up to finally resolve them and that there are so many veterans who feel so strongly about this.”

Please see the original and read the entire article here

February 9, 2012 Posted by | Civilian Contractors, Contractor Casualties, Contractors Missing | , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Kidnapped US aid contractor reportedly held by militants in Pakistan

MinnPost.com  January 26, 2012

A kidnapped American aid contractor is alive and in good health, being held by a Pakistani Al Qaeda affiliate that’s likely to use him as a bargaining chip, according to militants, security officials, and analysts.

Warren Weinstein, who was kidnapped in August from his home in Lahore, Pakistan, is in the custody of Lashkar-e-Jhangvi militants in North Waziristan, a ranking Pakistani militant told McClatchy. The militant said he’d seen Mr. Weinstein last month and at that point “his health was fine.”

“He is being provided all available medical treatment, including regular checkups by a doctor and the medicines prescribed for him before he was plucked,” the militant, who spoke only on the condition of anonymity due to the sensitivity of the issue, said last week in an interview.

Little has been revealed publicly about Weinstein’s status since December, when Ayman al Zawahiri, the head of Al Qaeda, said in a video that the terrorist network was holding him.

Weinstein, who’s from Rockville, Md., spent several years as the Pakistan country manager for J.E. Austin Associates, a contractor for the US Agency for International Development. Reportedly in ill health, he’d packed his bags and was within hours of leaving Pakistan for good on Aug. 13 when militants kidnapped him from his home in the affluent suburb of Model Town.

January 26, 2012 Posted by | Civilian Contractors, Contractors Kidnapped, Contractors Missing, Pakistan, Safety and Security Issues, State Department, USAID | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Include US Civilian Contractors in US Deaths/Injured in Iraq and Afghanistan

The President of the United States: Include U.S Civilian Contractors in Deaths/Injured in Iraq & Afghanistan

Please go here to sign the petition

Why This Is Important

As Americans, we all feel a sense of patriotism when it comes to our great country. The men and women who chose to go to Iraq and Afghanistan in a civilian capacity to serve our country are NOT included in the numbers when they tally the numbers of Deaths and Injured. Why should they be included you may ask? Why should they be excluded I ask.

When a civilian contractor is killed or injured the American people are paying the bill. Survivor benefits, worker’s compensation, funeral expenses, medical expenses etc are all paid for by the American people. While the multi-billion dollar private military companies like (DynCorp, KBR, Xe, etc.) sit back and continue to reap the benefits of the continued international conflicts.

If you know a civilian contractor who is currently employed, has been injured, has been killed please sign our petition. Although many of these men and women who chose to serve our country in the civilian capacity are retired military personnel, they receive no acknowldgement of their sacrafices when they are injured or killed.

Instead our Government wants to hide these brave men and women and not include these losses in the numbers of Americans who have sacrificed

Please sign the petition here

December 15, 2011 Posted by | Afghanistan, AIG and CNA, Blackwater, Civilian Contractors, Contractor Casualties, Contractors Missing, Defense Base Act, Department of Defense, Follow the Money, Iraq, KBR, Pentagon, Politics, Private Military Contractors, Private Security Contractor, State Department, Traumatic Brain Injury, USACE, USAID, Wartime Contracting | , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

4 Afghan Aid Workers Kidnapped in Northern Afghanistan

VOA News

Officials say four Afghans working for a French development organization have been kidnapped in northern Afghanistan.

Afghan government officials say the aid workers were kidnapped Monday while heading back from work in Faryab province.

No one has yet claimed responsibility for the abduction, and the condition of the workers is not known.

The relief organization, known as ACTED, works primarily in the field of rural development, civil society, and agriculture.

In other violence in Afghanistan, six civilians were killed Monday in twin explosions in eastern Afghanistan. The attacks took place in the Dangam district of Kunar province.

Authorities say a civilian vehicle struck a roadside bomb and when passers-by ran to assist the driver, another mine exploded. Six people were killed and two wounded in the blasts.

Also Monday, NATO said one of its service members was killed in southern Afghanistan. The coalition said it was investigating the circumstances of the soldier’s death and gave no other details

Please see the original here

October 11, 2011 Posted by | Afghanistan, Civilian Contractors, Contractors Kidnapped, Contractors Missing, NGO's, Safety and Security Issues | , , , , | Leave a comment

Afghans trying to retrieve bodies of German hikers (Aid Workers)

KABUL, Afghanistan (AP)

Afghan police mounted a ground operation Tuesday to retrieve the bodies of two Germans found shot to death on a remote mountain after they disappeared while hiking nearly three weeks ago

About 100 kilometers (60 miles) to the north of the capital in Parwan, officials ditched a plan to use helicopters to bring the bodies out because helicopters cannot easily fly to the high-altitude region in the Hindu Kush mountains where the bodies were found, said NATO spokesman Capt. Justin Brockhoff. Instead, police are hiking to the site and back, which could take at least eight hours, to carry the bodies down, said Parwan province Police Chief Gen. Sher Ahmad Maladani.

The two men were found Monday with bullet wounds in their chests, their bodies stuffed in cloth sacks, officials said. It was unclear when they died.

A spokesman for the Afghan agriculture ministry said the two worked for a German development and assistance organization, GIZ. Majeed Qarar, the spokesman, said they were advisers to the agriculture ministry and that they regularly went hiking in the mountains in Parwan.

A spokesman for GIZ declined to comment, referring all queries to the German foreign ministry.

Please read the entire story here

September 6, 2011 Posted by | Afghanistan, Civilian Contractors, Contractor Casualties, Contractors Missing, Safety and Security Issues | , , , , | Leave a comment

U.S. engineer’s remains found in Afghanistan

Kidnapped Army Corps worker killed in Afghanistan

Channel 13 WVEC Washington DC  September 7, 2011 8:00 pm

A man who worked for the US Army Corps of Engineers in Norfolk was killed in Afghanistan.

James W. Coker, 59, of Mount Pleasant, S.C., was pronounced dead Sept. 5 in Kabul, Afghanistan, while on temporary assignment with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Coker worked for Naval Facilities Engineering Command Atlantic in Norfolk.

The circumstances surrounding Coker’s death are under investigation.

According to the Associated Press, Coker was a civilian working with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers when he was kidnapped from his Afghanistan power plant and strangled to death.

Carrie Hughes, Coker’s daughter, told The Associated Press that military officers came to her house near Charleston, South Carolina on Monday to inform her that her father had been killed.

It was not known who killed the Coker or under what circumstances he was abducted. Also Tuesday, the bodies of two Germans who had apparently been murdered were retrieved from a remote location. Neither area is known to be a hotbed of militant activity.

CBS News  September 6, 2007

An Afghan military official tells CBS News that the body of a U.S. national was found beheaded on Monday in eastern Kabul, days after a civilian engineer went missing in the capital city.

Intelligence sources in Afghanistan told the Reuters news agency the body was that of the missing American civilian, and the international military coalition confirmed that a U.S. engineer had been killed.

Please see the original here

Special section: Afghanistan

The slain engineer was identified as James W. “Will” Coker by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, for which he worked in Kabul as a construction contractor.

Kidnappings and targeted killings of foreigners are common in Afghanistan, but less so in the sprawling capital city, which has seen less impact from the Taliban- and al Qaeda-led insurgency plaguing many parts of the nation.

Coker was reported missing on Monday, but sources tell CBS News he actually disappeared on Sept. 2

September 6, 2011 Posted by | Afghanistan, Civilian Contractors, Contractor Casualties, Contractors Kidnapped, Contractors Missing, USACE | , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Iraq militants say they will not hand over Briton

GulfNews.com  July 9, 2010

Baghdad: A Shiite militant group in Iraq said on Saturday that it would not hand over a British bodyguard it abducted four years ago, in a statement worded to suggest Alan McMenemy remains alive.

“The American occupiers did not stop their procrastination and delays in handing over our mujahedeen (holy warriors) in their prisons, so we declare we will not give them the British hostage Alan McMenemy,” said a statement from the Asaib Ahel al-Haq, or League of the Righteous.

“We will keep him until our demands our met,” said the statement, signed by Sheikh Akram al-Ka’bi, the deputy leader of the group, which Washington says is backed by Iran.

McMenemy dead or alive

The Arabic-language statement was worded to suggest that McMenemy, 34, was still alive, although the British government has believed for some time that he was killed by his kidnappers.

He was one of four bodyguards working with British computer consultant Peter Moore, when the five were kidnapped from the finance ministry in Baghdad in May 2007 by some 40 gunmen from the breakaway Shiite militia.

Moore was released unharmed in December 2009, and the bodies of the three other Britons, Alec MacLachlan, 30, Jason Swindlehurst, 38, and Jason Creswell, 39, were handed over to British officials in 2009.

The Iraqi government said in January last year it was expecting the Shiite group to imminently hand over McMenemy’s body, but the handover never happened

Please read more here

July 9, 2011 Posted by | Civilian Contractors, Contractors Kidnapped, Contractors Missing, Iraq, Private Security Contractor | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Information sought regarding 3 missing men in the Gardez / Khost region of Afghanistan

We have confirmed that these men were recovered and have returned safely to their home countries.

Missing and reported several days overdue are.

39 yr old Carlos Emilio Perezeo of Belize,

40 yr old Willam Stricklund of the Gulf Islands Canada,

both Security Contractors,

and Sales Rep

Mr.Enrico Michael Lopez 46yrs old of El Salvadore.


It is NOT believed these contractors have met any foul play.

Their vehicle was recovered and appears to have suffered Catastrophic Mechanical Failure,

Its apppears the men may have set out on foot ,their last known location was in Zharandi Sar a mountainous region approx 40 miles east of Gardez Afghanistan along the Gardez/ Khost Highway.

Any and all info and tips can be forwarded to
oilandgassupressionsystems@gmail.com
attention : Paulo

June 23, 2011 Posted by | Afghanistan, Civilian Contractors, Contractors Missing | , , | 5 Comments