Overseas Civilian Contractors

News and issues relating to Civilian Contractors working Overseas

Truth, lies and Afghanistan

How military leaders have let us down
By LT. COL. DANIEL L. DAVIS
Armed Forces Journal  February

I spent last year in Afghanistan, visiting and talking with U.S. troops and their Afghan partners. My duties with the Army’s Rapid Equipping Force took me into every significant area where our soldiers engage the enemy. Over the course of 12 months, I covered more than 9,000 miles and talked, traveled and patrolled with troops in Kandahar, Kunar, Ghazni, Khost, Paktika, Kunduz, Balkh, Nangarhar and other provinces.

What I saw bore no resemblance to rosy official statements by U.S. military leaders about conditions on the ground.

Entering this deployment, I was sincerely hoping to learn that the claims were true: that conditions in Afghanistan were improving, that the local government and military were progressing toward self-sufficiency. I did not need to witness dramatic improvements to be reassured, but merely hoped to see evidence of positive trends, to see companies or battalions produce even minimal but sustainable progress.

 Instead, I witnessed the absence of success on virtually every level.
Please go to Armed Forces Journal and read this in it’s entirety here

February 6, 2012 Posted by | Afghanistan | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

DynCorp Is Two Years Late Finishing Afghan Barracks Construction

By Tony Cappaccio at Bloomberg

DynCorp International Inc., the largest contractor in Afghanistan, is running two years late in completing construction of a barracks for use by Afghan security forces, according to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

The $72.8 million, two-phase project for Kunduz was originally scheduled to be completed in June 2009. The date was extended to August 2010. The latest completion target is May 31, Corps spokesman Eugene Pawlik said in an e-mail yesterday.

Construction delays at the Kunduz barracks, in northern Afghanistan, and at other facilities throughout the country complicates the U.S. process of turning over security functions to Afghan forces, said Charles Tiefer, a member of the Commission on Wartime Contracting.

“It’s a setback in our hoped-for rapid build-up of the Afghan army’s infrastructure, which needs top priority if we’re to meet the deadline of turning responsibility for the country’s security to these Afghan forces in 2014,” Tiefer, a University of Baltimore professor, said in an e-mail today. The eight- member commission was established by Congress to monitor contracting in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Ashley Burke, a spokeswoman for Falls Church, Virginia- based DynCorp, said in an e-mail that “unanticipated soil abnormalities were a major issue impeding the construction progress.” DynCorp was acquired last year by New York-based Cerberus Capital Management LP.  Please read the entire article here

March 8, 2011 Posted by | Afghanistan, Civilian Contractors, DynCorp, Government Contractor, USACE | , , , , | Leave a comment