Overseas Civilian Contractors

News and issues relating to Civilian Contractors working Overseas

Afghanistan poppy killers get scrutiny absent in prior contracts

U.S. contractors with almost $2 billion worth of counter-narcotics business in Afghanistan will get more scrutiny than they faced for work completed in Latin America over the past decade, government officials said.

The Washington Post  June 26, 2011

DynCorp International, Lockheed Martin, Raytheon, ITT and ARINC, which are working with the Defense and State departments on anti-drug efforts in Afghanistan, performed similar work in Latin America with inadequate competition and little oversight, according to a report by the majority staff of a Senate Homeland Security subcommittee and a previous investigation by the Pentagon’s inspector general.

The contractors should expect new accountability measures at State and the Pentagon, as well as heightened scrutiny from Congress, as the United States seeks to stabilize the government in Afghanistan, where drug trafficking generates as much as $100 million a year for the Taliban, officials said.

“Many of the things we’ve been doing in Afghanistan, it’s not reinventing the wheel — we’ve been doing it in Colombia for a decade, and with many of the same contractors,” said Laura Myron, a spokeswoman for Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.), chairwoman of the subcommittee.

McCaskill is to convene a hearing this week on Afghanistan contracting, at which she’ll address the counter-narcotics work, Myron said in an e-mail.

Please read the entire story at The Washington Post

June 27, 2011 Posted by | Afghanistan, Civilian Contractors, Contractor Oversight, Department of Defense, DynCorp, Pentagon, State Department | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Billions More Wasted on Anti-Drug Contracts in Latin America

Noel Brinkerhoff, David Wallechinsky  All Gov  June 15, 2011

It’s impossible to know if the federal government is effectively spending billions of dollars on contractors to help fight the nation’s war on drugs, says a U.S. senator.
Democrat Claire McCaskill of Missouri, chair of the Subcommittee on Contracting Oversight, says there is “insufficient oversight of counternarcotics contracts at the Departments of State and Defense,” making it difficult to assess the success of spending $3.1 billion on such work between 2005 and 2009.
McCaskill points to a lack of transparency at both departments, where no centralized database or system has been established to track counternarcotics contracts. To make matters worse, the Defense Department has admitted that the current systems it is relying on are “inconsistent,” “time-consuming and error-prone.”
Spending on counternarcotics contracts increased by 32% over a five-year period, says McCaskill, but contract management and oversight was found to be insufficient.
The majority of the money, $1.8 billion, went to just five contractors: DynCorp, Lockheed Martin, Raytheon, ITT, and ARINC, with $1.1 billion going to DynCorp.
Slightly more than half of the money was spent “on aircraft-related services, maintenance, logistics, support, equipment, and training.” The rest went to other equipment and supplies, intelligence and surveillance, information technology and communications equipment and services, construction and logistics, and personnel.
Although the contracts were spent for operations in eight Latin American countries, almost $2 billion went to Colombia alone.

June 15, 2011 Posted by | Central America, Contract Awards, Contractor Oversight, Contracts Awarded, Department of Defense, Follow the Money, State Department | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Iraq to buy Mi-17 Helicopters support services for $152 million

The Defense Security Cooperation Agency notified Congress today of a possible Foreign Military Sale to Iraq of contractor logistics support for various helicopters for an estimated cost of $152 million.

The Government of Iraq has requested a possible sale of two years of contractor logistics support for Mi-17 Helicopters and two years of logistics support for U.S.-origin rotary wing aircraft not in DoD’s inventory.

The estimated cost is $152 million.

This proposed sale will contribute to the foreign policy and national security of the United States by helping to improve the security of a friendly country. This proposed sale directly supports the Iraq government and serves the interests of the Iraqi people and the U.S.This proposed sale will advance Iraqi efforts to develop a strong national military and police force structure. The support and services will enable Iraq to equip new forces to assume the missions currently accomplished by U.S. and coalition forces and to sustain itself in its efforts to bring stability to Iraq.

The proposed sale of this service will not alter the basic military balance in the region.

The prime contractor will be ARINC in Annapolis, Maryland. There are no known offset agreements proposed in connection with this potential sale.

Implementation of this sale will require the assignment of multiple U.S. Government or contractor representatives to Iraq for a period of two years with an option to extend them for additional years.

August 6, 2010 Posted by | Civilian Contractors, Iraq | , , , , | Leave a comment