Overseas Civilian Contractors

News and issues relating to Civilian Contractors working Overseas

Afghan National Police Contract Requirements Were Not Clearly Defined but Contract Administration Improved

DODIG-2012-094    May 30, 2012

MEMORANDUM FOR DEPUTY COMMANDING GENERAL FOR SUPPORT,
NORTH ATLANTIC TREATY ORGANIZATION TRAINING
MISSION-AGHANISTAN/COMBINED SECURITY
TRANSITION COMMAND-AFGHAN 1STAN
AUDITOR GENERAL, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY
COMMANDER, DEFENSE CONTRACT MANAGEMENT
AGENCY, AFGHANISTAN

SUBJECT: Afghan National Police Contract Requirements Were Not Clearly Defined but
Contract Administration Improved (Report No.  DODIG-2012-094)

We are providing this repoli for your information and use,   This is one in a series of reports on
the DoD Afghan National Police contract.     We considered management comments on a draft of
this report when preparing the final report. The management comments conformed to the
requirements of DoD Directive 7650.3; therefore, additional comments are not required

Please read the report here

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June 1, 2012 Posted by | Afghanistan, Contractor Oversight, Department of Defense, DynCorp, NATO, Wartime Contracting | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

More DoD Investigations of Allegations of U.S. Contractor-Fueled Human Trafficking

By NICK SCHWELLENBACH at POGO  January 26, 2012

It appears that Fiscal Year 2011 saw more Defense Department criminal investigations of alleged human trafficking by its contractor supply chain than in any one of the last five years, according to a Pentagon inspector general report publicly released today (it is dated January 17).

All three investigations involved or allegedly involved U.S. government contractors or subcontractors in Southwest Asia: Iraq, Kuwait and Afghanistan.

“While not criminal prosecutions, there have been some civil and administrative actions recently. Earlier this year, the Justice Department joined a whistleblower qui tam lawsuit that alleged that ArmorGroup North America had not reported trafficking-in-persons violations by its personnel as required by its contract. ArmorGroup North America, which had a contract to defend the U.S. Embassy in Kabul, settled the lawsuit for $7.5 million. ArmorGroup North America’s parent company said in a statement that the settlement was made “to avoid costly and disruptive litigation—and that there has been no finding or admission of liability.”

Please read the entire post here

January 26, 2012 Posted by | Afghanistan, Africa, ArmorGroup, Civilian Contractors, Contractor Oversight, Department of Defense, Human Trafficking, Legal Jurisdictions, State Department | , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Evaluation of DOD Contracts Regarding Combating Trafficking in Persons: (Report No. DODlG-20l2-041)

January 17, 2012

Evaluation of DOD Contracts Regarding Combating Trafficking in Persons:
              U.S.  European Command and U.S. Africa Command
              (Report No.  DODlG-20l2-041)

January 26, 2012 Posted by | Afghanistan, Africa, ArmorGroup, Civilian Contractors, Contractor Oversight, Department of Defense, Human Trafficking | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Pentagon watchdog broken, U.S. money at risk: report

The Pentagon’s top watchdog has abandoned efforts to do in-depth audits of defense contracts, leaving billions of dollars in taxpayer money at risk because of overpayments and fraud, according to an investigative report due to be made public on Thursday.

Rueters by Scot J Paltrow

The report, written by Republican Senator Chuck Grassley’s staff and obtained by Reuters, concludes that the Defense Department’s Office of Inspector General has focused instead on less important types of audits, and that its productivity has plunged in recent years.

It said the inspector general’s office in fiscal 2009, which ended September 30, 2009, did not audit any “major or non-major weapons contract or contractor.”

The report contends too that the inspector general’s office has failed to follow up even when it finds evidence of serious misdeeds.

In one example, auditors in 2007 stumbled upon a recurring error in the Pentagon’s overall financial statements, because military officials had failed to record $1 billion in proceeds from the sale of closed U.S. military bases in Europe.

They also found that about $107 million of the money had disappeared. However, senior officials turned down the auditors’ recommendation to launch an investigation.

The watchdog’s poor performance, the report says, has resulted in little oversight in recent years of annual payments to contractors, which currently total more than $390 billion, up from $154 billion in 2001.

The report said that misdirected efforts by the watchdog left “huge sums of the taxpayers’ money vulnerable to fraud and outright theft.”

It said this lack of thorough audits occurred despite a 35 percent increase in the inspector general’s staff since 2003, to 765 employees.

The Grassley report, however, also puts heavy blame on the Defense Department itself for inadequate oversight of contracts.  Please read the entire story here

September 9, 2010 Posted by | Afghanistan, Civilian Contractors, Contractor Oversight, DynCorp, Iraq, Kuwait, Pentagon | , , , , , | Leave a comment