Overseas Civilian Contractors

News and issues relating to Civilian Contractors working Overseas

Look Out, 4-Star General Coming Through…the Revolving Door

Nick Schwellenbach Time’s Battleland Blog  February 2, 2012

On Friday last week, Raytheon, a major defense contractor, announced it scored a four-star general! Marine Corps Gen. (Ret.) James E. Cartwright, the recently departed vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, joined the defense giant’s board of directors.

Raytheon Chairman and CEO William H. Swanson said in a written statement, ”General Cartwright’s deep understanding of defense and broad experience in military operations and matters of national security will be of great value to our Board.” I’m sure Cartwright will be.

The Boston Globe’s Bryan Bender penned an in-depth article on generals and admirals going through the revolving door in late 2010. Bender quoted retired General Robert “Doc’’ Foglesong, who retired as the second-ranking Air Force officer in 2006, who said the “fundamental question” swirling around the phenomenon of generals going through the revolving door “is whether this is shaping the acquisition system and influencing what the Pentagon buys. I think the answer is yes.’’

On the civilian side, the revolving door is also rampant, raising many of the same questions. Take for instance, the recent announcement that the Pentagon’s former number two official, William J. Lynn III, is going to head DRS Technologies, the U.S. subsidiary of Finmeccanica, an Italian company. This isn’t Lynn’s first spin through the revolving door: he was formerly the Pentagon’s comptroller under the Clinton presidency, then left to head Raytheon’s lobbying operations in D.C., before becoming the Deputy Secretary of Defense.

Please see the original and read more at the Battleland Blog

February 2, 2012 Posted by | Civilian Contractors, Contractor Oversight, Department of Defense | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Government Contractor in Iraq for seven years, Daniel Phillips, arrested for rape of young girl

Update:  Daniel was working for DRS Technologies formerly Tamsco.  He was working at a small satellite site at Joint Base Balad.

I want to know who this dirt bag has been working for in Iraq and how he was able to get past the “wants and warrants” check for a Common Access Card (CAC). I would also be interested to see how many times he R&R’d to SE Asian countries such as Thailand where you can just buy yourself a little girl!  MsSparky

WKTR TV 3

Norfolk police, with the assistance from the federal government, arrested a civilian government contractor that was wanted for the rape of a juvenile female relative between 2004 and 2005. The suspect fled to Iraq soon after the crime to avoid arrest and began working with computers as a government contractor.

Investigators began tracking the location of Daniel Phillips, age 46, in December of 2010. With the assistance of the federal government, Phillips was located in Iraq. Arrangements were made to fly Phillips to Kuwait and then Dulles International Airport in Northern Virginia.

Phillips arrived at Dulles Saturday morning. Norfolk Fugitive Investigators accompanied by U.S. Marshalls boarded the plane and took Phillips into custody without incident at approximately 7:15 a.m. He was returned to Norfolk and is currently in the Norfolk City Jail awaiting trial for rape, aggravated sexual battery, and indecent liberties with a child.  Please see the original here

Contractor Hid in Iraq for Seven Years over rape charge

Well, he didn’t stay there the whole time. A Virginia TV news crew caught up to a neighbor next door to Phillips’ Norfolk house. That neighbor, who identified herself only as Julie, suggested Phillips was a family man who’d traveled back to the US several times in recent years. “I see him only on occasion when he returns from overseas,” said the woman. “He’s always very supportive, a very nice, helpful neighbor.” Julie then added that she believed Phillips was married with six children.

The vetting process to become a contractor in Iraq varies from company to company, but it can be extremely thin. Once hired, these employees are supposed to go through a Contintental United States Replacement Center (CRC), an Army-run military processing facility such as this one in Ft. Benning, Georgia. There, they go through a weeklong medical and background screening, at the end of which they’re issued a microchipped military ID card and put on a military flight to their destination in Iraq, or Afghanistan, or wherever.

Additionally, when individual contractors in Iraq wish to take leave elsewhere, they must go through a thorough process to be manifested on a flight out—usually in a military aircraft—along with multiple military checks in which their ID card is scanned. (And when they leave their Iraq jobs, contractors must go through exacting procedures in Kuwait and the stateside CRC center yet again.)

But apparently, none of that kept Phillips from staying on as an Iraq contractor for seven years, with military-sanctioned vacation jaunts back to the States, all while authorities sought his arrest.

According to Sgt. Boe Bostjancic of the Norfolk Police Department, those authorities only caught scent of Phillips’ trail late last year, tracing him to Iraq through emails, faxes, and phone calls he’d made. At that point, the local cops solicited help from military investigators, the US Marshals, and the State Department.

“They were able to call back very very quickly, and said, ‘Well, we found him in a base in Iraq, you’re right,’” Bostjancic told reporters. “And they…red-flagged him and pulled his passport.”

There are plenty of questions in this case, such as: How many other criminal suspects are hiding out on US military bases overseas? And why was it so easy for a man like Phillips to slip through the safeguards that are in place? What company or companies did Phillips work for? And what did he do with the presumable pile of money he made over the past near-decade?

In any case, Phillips isn’t talking. He declined inquiries from reporters Tuesday from his Norfolk City Jail cell.

January 11, 2011 Posted by | Civilian Contractors, Government Contractor, Iraq, Legal Jurisdictions, Safety and Security Issues, Vetting Employees | , , , , , , , | 10 Comments

   

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