Overseas Civilian Contractors

News and issues relating to Civilian Contractors working Overseas

Jordan- Israeli demining operations to take place near Balqa on Today

MENAFN – Jordan Times  May 24, 2012

The Jordan Armed Forces on Wednesday said Israeli troops will work on removing anti-tank mines in the land opposite Al Rabei area in Deir Alla in Balqa Governorate on Thursday.

The mine clearance will be carried out from 8:00am to 7:00pm, according to a source from the JAF, who noted that Jordan has requested that Israelis abide by the amounts of explosives previously agreed on during demining operations.

May 24, 2012 Posted by | Bomb Disposal, Demining, Explosive Remnants of War, Landmines, Mine Clearance | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

US oilman accused of bribing Jordan official to win contract

Lawsuit alleges Floridian wired millions to mystery man in Jordanian intelligence agency

by Penn Bullock at MSNBC.com  April 20, 2011

Harry Sargeant III, center, looks on as former Florida Gov. Charlie Crist greets Jordan's King Abdullah II in 2007.

A member of Jordan’s royal family is accusing an American oilman and former GOP fundraiser of bribing the Jordanian government to facilitate his fuel shipments through the country to U.S. forces in Iraq.

The allegation emerged in a civil lawsuit pitting the billionaire American businessman, Harry Sargeant III, against an ex-business partner, Mohammad al-Saleh, the brother-in-law of Jordan’s King Abdullah II.

Al-Saleh, the plaintiff in the case first reported by NBC News in May 2008, claims that he was cut out of a lucrative one-third share in Sargeant’s firm, the International Oil Trading Co., based in Boca Raton, Fla., and replaced by an ex-CIA official with deep contacts in the Jordanian government.

The crux of the bribery allegation involves a $9 million wire transfer from Sargeant’s firm, directed to a mysterious figure in Jordan’s intelligence agency identified in court documents only as “Pasha.”

Sargeant’s lawyers acknowledge that “Pasha” was “possibly” Gen. Mohammad Dahabi, then head of the General Intelligence Directorate (GID), Jordan’s intelligence agency. A source inside the Jordanian government confirmed that.

Kickback or legitimate payment?    Read more here


April 20, 2011 Posted by | Civilian Contractors, Contractor Oversight, Department of Defense, Follow the Money, Government Contractor, Iraq | , , , , | Leave a comment

EMPLOYEE OF U.S. EMBASSY IN BAGHDAD CONVICTED OF STEALING NEARLY $250,000

Thanks to the Cypress Times

WASHINGTON – An employee of the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad, Iraq, was found guilty today by a jury in Alexandria, Va., of stealing nearly $250,000 intended for the payment of shipping and customs services for the embassy, announced Assistant Attorney General Lanny A. Breuer of the Criminal Division and U.S. Attorney Neil H. MacBride for the Eastern District of Virginia.

Osama Esam Saleem Ayesh, 36, is a resident of Jordan hired by the Department of State as a shipping and customs supervisor at the embassy in Baghdad, who oversaw the shipments of personal property of embassy officials and personnel in Iraq. His duties required that he maintain close contact with local Iraqi companies and vendors with expertise in clearing goods through Iraqi customs. As a State Department employee, Ayesh was aware that he would be subject to the conflict of interest laws of the United States that prohibit government employees from using their position for personal profit.

On Oct. 15, 2010, Ayesh was indicted by a grand jury on two counts of theft of public money and one count of engaging in acts affecting a personal financial interest. Today, a jury found him guilty on all three counts. He faces a maximum penalty of 10 years for each theft count and five years in prison for the conflict of interest charge when he is sentenced on April 8, 2011, by U.S. District Judge T. S. Ellis III. Ayesh was arrested at Dulles International Airport on Aug. 16, 2010.

According to court records, Ayesh used his State Department computer to create a phony e-mail account in the name of a real Iraqi contractor and used that e-mail account to impersonate the contractor in communications with embassy procurement officials. He also established a bank account in Jordan under his wife’s name to further his criminal scheme and falsified wire transfer instructions that directed U.S. government electronic funds transfers to that account.

Court records and evidence at trial showed that Ayesh was personally involved in establishing and operating blanket purchase agreements for the provision of customs clearance and delivery services to the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad. From November 2008 to June 2010, Ayesh submitted false invoices in the name of an Iraqi contractor – which Ayesh fabricated on blank stationery he kept in his embassy apartment – and caused the U.S. Department of State to wire $243,416 to his wife’s account in Jordan.

This case was prosecuted by David Laufman of the Criminal Division’s Fraud Section, who is on detail to the Department of Justice from the Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction, and Assistant U.S. Attorney Thomas McQuillan of the Eastern District of Virginia. The Criminal Division’s Office of International Affairs provided assistance in this matter. The case was investigated by special agents of the State Department’s Office of Inspector General and the FBI’s Washington Field Office.  Please read the original here

February 2, 2011 Posted by | Follow the Money, State Department | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Phillipine Gov’t retains OFW ban in 6 countries

MANILA, PhilippinesThe government is retaining the ban on the deployment of Filipino workers to Afghanistan, Iraq, Lebanon, Jordan, Nigeria, and Somalia, mainly because of the unstable and volatile security situation in these countries, the Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA) said.

Overseas Filipino workers (OFW) groups in Afghanistan and Iraq earlier appealed to the government to lift the labor deployment ban.

But an interagency committee which periodically reviews the policy recommended against the lifting of the ban because of the unstable security situation in these war-torn countries.

According to DFA spokesman J. Eduardo Malaya, adequate terms of employment and the overall safety and security of OFWs cannot be assured in these countries, as required by the Migrant Workers Act, or Republic Act 8042.

The law mandates that the government adhere to strict guidelines in allowing the deployment of OFWs to other countries. It also imposes heavy penalties on government officials who allow the deployment of migrant workers without the guarantees required by law.

The committee, led by the DFA, also includes the Department of Labor and Employment, the Philippine Overseas Employment Administration, and the Overseas Workers Welfare Administration.

The DFA has yet to comment on reports that foreign civilian contractors in Afghanistan have started terminating Filipino workers in line with a September 17 order issued by the US Central Command (Centcom). Please read the entire story here

January 19, 2011 Posted by | Afghanistan, Civilian Contractors, Iraq, Safety and Security Issues | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Anham Says Logistics Contract With U.S. Department of Defense is Final

Bloomberg Middle East

Anham FCZO LLC said its logistics contract with the U.S. Department of Defense is final and that it has started to implement it with a view to fully taking over the order by the end of this year.

“It has been final for a while,” Managing Director Mogheith Sukhtian told reporters today in Kuwait City. “We have a signed contract with the U.S. government.”

Dubai-based Anham said April 16 it was awarded a $2.2 billion contract by the U.S. Defense Department to provide logistical support to U.S. troops in Iraq, Kuwait and Jordan.

Kuwait & Gulf Link Transport Co., a cargo shipper, said April 28 that it filed an objection to the awarding of the contract to Anham, which it said failed to meet criteria. The U.S. Defense Logistics Agency decided to take “corrective measures” regarding the objection and will receive amended offers from bidders “to take new decisions for a new settlement,” Kuwait & Gulf Link said in July.

“The protest process is a part of the U.S. government contracting process and it’s conducted in the normal course of U.S government contracts,” Sukhtian said. “So we’re undergoing the process but in the meantime, what we can say, is that the contract is being executed. We anticipate the transition between the incumbent and us to be completed by the end of the year,” Sukhtian added.

The incumbent contractor, Agility Public Warehousing Co., is the Middle East’s largest storage and logistics company and faces charges of overbilling the U.S government on a multibillion dollar contract to supply food for troops in Kuwait and Iraq. Agility had said it was in talks to resolve legal cases with the U.S. Department of Justice and there was no guarantee a settlement would be agreed.

A U.S. magistrate recommended the dismissal of an indictment against Agility’s unit, Agility DGS Holdings Inc., in connection with the company’s contract to feed U.S. troops in Iraq and Kuwait, Agility said Oct. 11. Please see the original story here

 

October 28, 2010 Posted by | Civilian Contractors, Contract Awards, Iraq, Kuwait | , , , , , | Leave a comment

New defendants in Kuwaiti military contractor indictment

By Bill Rankin

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Federal prosecutors have obtained a new indictment charging a Kuwaiti firm and two of its affiliates of defrauding the U.S. military on billion-dollar supply contracts.

The indictment, which remains under seal, was disclosed during a hearing Monday in U.S. District Court in Atlanta. Public Warehousing Co., now known as Agility, had previously been indicted on charges it gouged the Defense Department by overcharging food supplies being delivered to U.S. troops in Iraq, Kuwait and Jordan. The new indictment also names Agility DGS Logistics Services Co. KSCC and Agility DGS Holdings Inc.

Lawyers for the companies asked U.S. Magistrate Alan Baverman to keep the new indictment sealed for seven days, saying it might help settlement negotiations. Assistant U.S. Attorney Barbara Nelan disagreed, saying that unsealing the new charges “may be helpful” to the parties’ attempts to reach a settlement.

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution previously reported that parties in the case had been negotiating a possible settlement that could reach $750 million. Since the indictment, the Defense Logistics Agency, which provides supplies to U.S. armed forces worldwide, has barred Agility and 100 of its affiliates from receiving new contracts from the government pending the outcome of the Atlanta case.

Agility has long maintained federal prosecutors did not properly serve the company with the indictment. At Monday’s hearing, only a lawyer for Agility DGS Holdings entered a not guilty plea. Lawyers for Agility and Agility DGS Logistics Services declined, so Baverman entered not guilty pleas for them.

“The decision by the U.S. Attorney’s office in Atlanta is regrettable,” the company said in a statement issued after Monday’s hearing. “This move serves only to taint PWC subsidiaries that have a strong record of on-the-job performance and compliance with U.S. law and federal acquisition regulations.”

April 12, 2010 Posted by | Contractor Corruption, Wartime Contracting | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

   

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