Overseas Civilian Contractors

News and issues relating to Civilian Contractors working Overseas

Look Out, 4-Star General Coming Through…the Revolving Door

Nick Schwellenbach Time’s Battleland Blog  February 2, 2012

On Friday last week, Raytheon, a major defense contractor, announced it scored a four-star general! Marine Corps Gen. (Ret.) James E. Cartwright, the recently departed vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, joined the defense giant’s board of directors.

Raytheon Chairman and CEO William H. Swanson said in a written statement, ”General Cartwright’s deep understanding of defense and broad experience in military operations and matters of national security will be of great value to our Board.” I’m sure Cartwright will be.

The Boston Globe’s Bryan Bender penned an in-depth article on generals and admirals going through the revolving door in late 2010. Bender quoted retired General Robert “Doc’’ Foglesong, who retired as the second-ranking Air Force officer in 2006, who said the “fundamental question” swirling around the phenomenon of generals going through the revolving door “is whether this is shaping the acquisition system and influencing what the Pentagon buys. I think the answer is yes.’’

On the civilian side, the revolving door is also rampant, raising many of the same questions. Take for instance, the recent announcement that the Pentagon’s former number two official, William J. Lynn III, is going to head DRS Technologies, the U.S. subsidiary of Finmeccanica, an Italian company. This isn’t Lynn’s first spin through the revolving door: he was formerly the Pentagon’s comptroller under the Clinton presidency, then left to head Raytheon’s lobbying operations in D.C., before becoming the Deputy Secretary of Defense.

Please see the original and read more at the Battleland Blog

February 2, 2012 Posted by | Civilian Contractors, Contractor Oversight, Department of Defense | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Defense Company Sales Hit by U.S. Debt Deal

Bloomberg   Aug 16, 2011

Nine of the biggest names in the U.S. defense industry receive more than 70 percent of their revenue from the federal government and have the most to lose in the budget cuts approved by Congress this month, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.

For these defense contractors, it’s a replay of the 1990s, when the Cold War ended and the Pentagon slashed spending by a third. For government contractors in all industries, however, the stakes are significant.

“For some companies, the consequences are going to be large,” said Peter Morici, former chief economist at theInternational Trade Commission and a business professor at the University of Maryland. “They’re going to have to sell to the private sector, and that’s not going to be easy for them.”

When it raised the debt limit earlier this month, Congress cut $917 billion in spending over the next decade. A special congressional panel is expected to convene in September to try to identify another $1.5 trillion of cuts.

The hardest-hit group probably will be the defense industry, which received the biggest chunk of the $532 billion in federal contracts last fiscal year, a sum that exceeds the budgets of the five largest states combined.

Nine companies with a market capitalization of $1 billion or more receive at least 70 percent of their revenue from the U.S. government, according to data compiled by Bloomberg:ManTech International Corp. (MANT), Booz Allen Hamilton Holding Corp. (BAH),Northrop Grumman Corp. (NOC), Raytheon Co. (RTN), CACI International Inc.,Lockheed Martin Corp. (LMT), Oshkosh Corp. (OSK), Harris Corp. and General Dynamics Corp. (GD) Three of those — ManTech, Booz Allen and Northrop Grumman — count on the federal government for more than 90 percent of their revenue

Read more here

August 17, 2011 Posted by | Civilian Contractors, Department of Defense, Government Contractor | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Afghanistan poppy killers get scrutiny absent in prior contracts

U.S. contractors with almost $2 billion worth of counter-narcotics business in Afghanistan will get more scrutiny than they faced for work completed in Latin America over the past decade, government officials said.

The Washington Post  June 26, 2011

DynCorp International, Lockheed Martin, Raytheon, ITT and ARINC, which are working with the Defense and State departments on anti-drug efforts in Afghanistan, performed similar work in Latin America with inadequate competition and little oversight, according to a report by the majority staff of a Senate Homeland Security subcommittee and a previous investigation by the Pentagon’s inspector general.

The contractors should expect new accountability measures at State and the Pentagon, as well as heightened scrutiny from Congress, as the United States seeks to stabilize the government in Afghanistan, where drug trafficking generates as much as $100 million a year for the Taliban, officials said.

“Many of the things we’ve been doing in Afghanistan, it’s not reinventing the wheel — we’ve been doing it in Colombia for a decade, and with many of the same contractors,” said Laura Myron, a spokeswoman for Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.), chairwoman of the subcommittee.

McCaskill is to convene a hearing this week on Afghanistan contracting, at which she’ll address the counter-narcotics work, Myron said in an e-mail.

Please read the entire story at The Washington Post

June 27, 2011 Posted by | Afghanistan, Civilian Contractors, Contractor Oversight, Department of Defense, DynCorp, Pentagon, State Department | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Billions More Wasted on Anti-Drug Contracts in Latin America

Noel Brinkerhoff, David Wallechinsky  All Gov  June 15, 2011

It’s impossible to know if the federal government is effectively spending billions of dollars on contractors to help fight the nation’s war on drugs, says a U.S. senator.
Democrat Claire McCaskill of Missouri, chair of the Subcommittee on Contracting Oversight, says there is “insufficient oversight of counternarcotics contracts at the Departments of State and Defense,” making it difficult to assess the success of spending $3.1 billion on such work between 2005 and 2009.
McCaskill points to a lack of transparency at both departments, where no centralized database or system has been established to track counternarcotics contracts. To make matters worse, the Defense Department has admitted that the current systems it is relying on are “inconsistent,” “time-consuming and error-prone.”
Spending on counternarcotics contracts increased by 32% over a five-year period, says McCaskill, but contract management and oversight was found to be insufficient.
The majority of the money, $1.8 billion, went to just five contractors: DynCorp, Lockheed Martin, Raytheon, ITT, and ARINC, with $1.1 billion going to DynCorp.
Slightly more than half of the money was spent “on aircraft-related services, maintenance, logistics, support, equipment, and training.” The rest went to other equipment and supplies, intelligence and surveillance, information technology and communications equipment and services, construction and logistics, and personnel.
Although the contracts were spent for operations in eight Latin American countries, almost $2 billion went to Colombia alone.

June 15, 2011 Posted by | Central America, Contract Awards, Contractor Oversight, Contracts Awarded, Department of Defense, Follow the Money, State Department | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Raytheon cannot read contract requirements? Fails to report Injuries to Department of Labor

I am at the Mercy of Liberty Mutual says Pacheco

Hundreds of injuries have occurred in Antarctica since 2001, according to documents obtained under the Freedom of Information Act, but only three cases have been reported to the U.S. Department of Labor. This, despite the fact that Antarctic contract employees are entitled to special insurance benefits under the Defense Base Act laws and contract companies are required to report all injuries to the Department of Labor. But Raytheon Polar Services (RPSC), the company hired to run the U.S. Antarctic program, failed to comply with the law.

When they do report an injury Liberty Mutual refuses to pay.

Why would Raytheon jeoparadize their quals to bid on further work to help the insurance company?

US Fails to Protect Workers in Antartica

Talk about on the job, our ever vigilant  MsSparky was there in person

MsSparky keeping an eye on Raytheon at Palmer Station Antarctica

I worked (wintered over) for at the ’s (NSF) Palmer Station, Antarctica in 2002. I know first hand the unique working conditions and safety hazards faced daily by employees at these U.S. stations. There is no hardware store or supply house down the street to get your parts and material from. If the person ordering parts for your job isn’t clear about the scope of the work, you may find yourself improvising. I also believe the NSF lacks in the oversight capabilities necessary to ensure all work is done to applicable codes and in a safe manner. Raytheon basically inspects themselves. Nothing independent about that!! They’ve gone unchecked for years. I know I brought several safety concerns to the attention of the Station Manager (a Raytheon employee) and was told “I just didn’t know how things were done down here!” (I think I worked for that same guy in Iraq!) I haven’t been following the Antarctica work much so I want to thank our friends at Defense Base Act Compensation Blog for bringing this story to my attention.

Rumor has it KBR is bidding on this contract.

Please read MsSparky’s post here



March 31, 2011 Posted by | Civilian Contractors, Contractor Casualties, Contractor Oversight, Defense Base Act, Follow the Money, KBR, Safety and Security Issues | , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

U.S. Department of Defense Announces Latest Contract Awards March 22 2010

U.S. Department of Defense Announces Latest Contract Awards

by Veterans Today

CONTRACTS: NAVY

Raytheon Co., Marlborough, Mass., is being awarded a $28,144,958 firm-fixed-price modification to a previously awarded contract (N00039-08-C-0115) for eight Submarine High Data Rate Antenna Systems.  Work will be performed in Marlborough, Mass. (69 percent) and St. Petersburg, Fla. (31 percent), and is expected to be completed by December 2010.  Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year.  This contract was not competitively procured because Raytheon developed the submarine antenna under contract N00039-04-D-0033, which was competitively awarded Oct. 23, 1996.  The Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command, San Diego, Calif., is the contracting activity.    See all contracts awarded at Veterans Today

March 22, 2010 Posted by | Contracts Awarded | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment