Overseas Civilian Contractors

News and issues relating to Civilian Contractors working Overseas

SIGAR Report Finds Afghanistan Reconstruction Compromised By Security, Corruption

Dan Froomkin Huffington Post  April 30, 2012

An Afghan private security man, part of a private security company called Arya stands guard outside of a guest house in Herat west of Kabul, Afghanistan, Feb. 8, 2012. The push by Afghanistan's president to nationalize legions of private security guards before the end of March is putting multibillion-dollar aid projects in jeopardy and creating a shaky structure ripe for corruption and abuse, according to companies trying to make the switch.(AP Photo/Hoshang Hashimi)

WASHINGTON — Afghan reconstruction efforts remain severely hampered even after nearly $100 billion in spending over the last 10 years, according to a new watchdog report. The most immediate challenge seems to stem from the insistence by Afghanistan’s government that the private army of hired guns providing security for ongoing projects be replaced with Afghan locals, who do not appear to be up to the job, the report noted.

The latest quarterly report from the Special Inspector General for Afghan Reconstruction (or SIGAR) released on Monday also chronicles how corruption in the country shows no signs of having let up.

The report’s most urgent warning concerns the “imminent transition” from private security contractors (PSC) to the state-owned Afghan Public Protection Force.

Steven J. Trent, the acting special inspector general, expressed concerns that as many as 29 major USAID projects costing nearly $1.5 billion are at risk of full or partial termination “if the APPF cannot provide the needed security.” About half that amount has already been spent.

And whether it can is very much an open question, Trent wrote. The U.S. embassy, the Afghan government and the U.S.-led military forces agreed a year ago to check the progress of the Afghan Public Protection Force at the 6-, 9-, and 12-month marks.

“The 6-month assessment, completed in September 2011, found that the APPF was not ready to assume any of the essential PSC responsibilities to meet contract requirements — such as training, equipping, and deploying guard forces,” the report pointed out. “[T]he December assessment, which would have been at the 9-month mark, has not yet been made public” and “the deadline for the 12-month assessment has passed.”

April 30, 2012 Posted by | Afghanistan, Civilian Contractors, Contingency Contracting, Contract Awards, Contract Solicitations, Contractor Corruption, Contractor Oversight, Contracts Awarded, Department of Defense, ISAF, SIGAR | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

SIGAR Audit -11-13 July 20, 2011

SIGAR Special Investigator General for Afghanistan Reconstruction

Limited Interagency Coordination and Insufficient Controls over U.S. Funds in Afghanistan Hamper U.S. Efforts to Develop the Afghan Financial Sector and Safeguard US Cash

SIGAR Audit -11-13

What SIGAR Reviewed
Since 2002, Congress has appropriated more than $70 billion to implement security and development assistance
projects in Afghanistan, with some of those funds converted into cash and flowing through the Afghan economy.  The
United States is implementing programs to increase the capacity of Afghanistan’s central bank (Da Afghanistan Bank, or
DAB) to regulate the nation’s 17 commercial banks and to strengthen U.S. and Afghan law enforcement agencies’
oversight over the flow of funds through the Afghan economy.  This report (1) evaluates U.S. efforts to improve the
capacity of the Afghan government to regulate the financial sector (which includes commercial banks and informal
financial organizations, or hawalas) and (2) assesses the controls that U.S. agencies use to track U.S. funds as they flow
through the Afghan economy.  To accomplish these objectives, we reviewed Afghan laws and U.S. policies, plans, and
progress reports relevant to U.S. financial sector development initiatives. We met with officials from the Departments
of State, Homeland Security (DHS), Treasury, Defense (DOD), and the U.S. Agency for International Development
(USAID).   We conducted our work in Washington, D.C., and Kabul, Afghanistan, from October 2010 to July 2011 in
accordance with generally accepted government auditing standards.

Please read the entire original report here

July 20, 2011 Posted by | Afghanistan, Civilian Contractors, Contingency Contracting, Contractor Corruption, Contractor Oversight, Department of Defense, Follow the Money, Government Contractor, Private Military Contractors, SIGAR, State Department, USAID | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

SIGAR Report April 30, 2011

Special Investigator General Afghanistan Reconstuction Quaterly Report April 2011
Opening Message from Herbert Richardson Acting Inspector General

May 1, 2011 Posted by | Afghanistan, Civilian Contractors, Contingency Contracting, Contractor Oversight, Government Contractor, SIGAR | , , , , | Leave a comment

John Brummet, Raymond DeNunzio fired from SIGAR

2 deputies fired from Afghan watchdog group

by the Associated Press at the Washington Post

The U.S. official assigned to combat corruption in the multibillion-dollar effort to rebuild Afghanistan, who has been criticized by lawmakers for incompetence and mismanagement, fired two top deputies Tuesday and pledged to focus on financial fraud and waste.

Arnold Fields, the special inspector general for Afghanistan reconstruction, said that the organization’s upper ranks needed “new blood,” and he rejected the idea that the changes were made to keep him from being fired.

“This is about making SIGAR a better organization,” he said, using the shorthand name for his office.

Last fall, key members of Congress urged President Obama to dismiss Fields. Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.), who chaired the contracting oversight subcommittee, joined GOP Sens. Tom Coburn (Okla.), Charles E. Grassley (Iowa) and Susan Collins (Maine) in calling SIGAR a “failing organization” in need of new leadership.

The senators said that Fields’s office has failed to aggressively oversee the $56 billion the United States has committed since 2002 to improving schools, roads, electricity and medical facilities in Afghanistan.

Fields said he removed John Brummet, the assistant inspector general for audits, and Raymond DiNunzio, the assistant inspector general for investigations. Their deputies will serve in acting capacities while Fields searches for replacements. DiNunzio will remain with the organization for 60 to 90 days as an adviser, Fields said. Brummet might also stay on for a limited period in a different capacity, Fields said.

Please see the original here See also Post at MsSparky

January 5, 2011 Posted by | Afghanistan, Civilian Contractors, Contractor Corruption, Contractor Oversight, SIGAR | , , , , | 2 Comments