Overseas Civilian Contractors

News and issues relating to Civilian Contractors working Overseas

Wackenhut, WSI, fired after nuke plant break-in

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) –  October 1, 2012

The security contractor at the Y-12 nuclear weapons plant in Tennessee was fired Monday after authorities said three protesters cut through fences and vandalized a building in an unprecedented break-in.

Security contractor WSI Oak Ridge said it has started winding down operations and will transfer its protective force functions to B&W Y-12, the managing contractor at the plant, over the next several weeks. The Department of Energy had earlier recommended that WSI’s contract be terminated.

The security contractor was criticized for its poor response when the protesters, including an 82-year-old Roman Catholic nun, cut through fences on July 28 and defaced a building that stores the plant’s weapons grade uranium

Please read the entire article here

October 2, 2012 Posted by | Civilian Contractors, Contractor Oversight, G4S, Private Security Contractor, Ronco, Ronco Consulting Corporation, Safety and Security Issues, Vetting Employees, Wackenhut | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Wackenhut, Murder, and Vetting Employees

The Washington Post  Associated Press October 1, 2012WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court won’t let the family of a raped and murdered college girl sue the employer of her killers for her 1979 death.

The high court on Monday refused to let the parents of Janet Chandler sue Wackenhut Corp., which in 1979 was hired to send security guards to Holland, Mich., to provide security during a strike.

Chandler, who was a 23-year-old college student working at a hotel, was kidnaped, raped and killed by Wackenhut guards, who then covered up her death. Six people were convicted of first or second degree murder, five of whom worked for Wackenhut. But the federal courts have said Chandler’s family cannot sue Wackenhut for her long-ago death.The high court refused to reconsider that ruling.

October 1, 2012 Posted by | Civilian Contractors, Civilian Police, Contractor Oversight, Lawsuits, Vetting Employees, Wackenhut | , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Family of US soldier sues Canadian security firm

LOS ANGELES  Associated Press   July 10, 2012

The family of a California soldier killed in Afghanistan has sued a Canadian military contractor for rehiring a security guard, an Afghan national, after he allegedly threatened to attack U.S. troops.

The wrongful-death lawsuit filed Monday in Los Angeles claims Tundra Strategies failed to document the threats made by Shir Ahmed and didn’t report the danger he posed to U.S. military officials.

Ahmed killed two U.S. soldiers and wounded four others at Forward Operating Base Frontenac in 2011. Among those killed was medic Rudy Acosta, whose family along with three survivors, filed the suit.

Ahmed was killed after he opened fire. U.S. officials said Tundra records show Ahmed wasn’t flagged as a threat because the allegations against him were unsubstantiated.

Please see the original and read more here

July 10, 2012 Posted by | Afghanistan, Civilian Contractors, Vetting Employees | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Quis custodiet ipsos custodes? Who watches the watchmen?

G4S Driver Steals GBN 1.5 million  June 23, 2012

Plovdiv. 33-year-old driver of armoured cash transport car in Plovdiv stole BGN 1.5 million.

The man was declared for a nationwide search. Yesterday at 14.25 in the First Regional Police Department was received a signal that there was an abandoned security van on Petrova Niva Str. During the investigative activities has been established that there were about BGN 1,5 million in a different currency missing from the car owned by a private security firm. Driver of the cash transport car George Enev (33) from the town of Plovdiv is suspected of committing the offense. In connection with the search police presence in Plovdiv is stepped up. Police stop vehicles and check IDs.
The inspection of the vehicle found that it is owned by a private security firm G4S. Clients of the security firm headquartered in England, are Governments, banks, insurance companies, industrial companies, commercial companies, public institutions and private individuals.

Last year, Danny Fitzsimons, a G4S ArmorGroup security guard in Iraq was convicted of shooting and killing two G4S colleagues, after a Baghdad bar fight. His family insisted he suffered from post-traumatic stress from an earlier stint in Iraq as a British paratrooper, and was so unstable, G4S ArmorGroup should never have hired him.

The Edmonton Journal  June 22, 2012

After last week’s triple homicide at the University of Alberta’s HUB Mall, that ancient question has haunting relevance.

Armoured car guards Michelle Shegelski, Brian Ilesic, Eddie Rejano, and their wounded colleague, Matthew Schuman, were employees of G4S Secure Solutions, the world’s largest private security company.

So was Travis Baumgartner, 21, now charged with shooting them. Over the last few days, G4S has repeatedly asked Edmontonians to donate to a trust fund the firm established for the victims’ families. G4S won’t say how much, if anything, it is contributing.

It’s a lovely gesture to create a trust to accommodate a spontaneous outpouring of community generosity. But for the world’s second-largest employer, a firm with 657,200 staff in more than 125 countries, to launch a corporate fundraising campaign, without leading by example, is little short of offensive.

According to G4S’s 2011 annual report, last year it had revenues of about $12 billion, and profits of about $317 million. It’s part of the security-industrial complex that ballooned after 9/11. The Anglo-Danish multinational doesn’t just guard bank deliveries. Cash security is just 17 per cent of its global business.

In Australia, G4S was hired to provide detention services for refugee claimants and prisoners, with disturbing results. In 2007, the Western Australia Human Rights Commission concluded G4S drivers locked detainees in a scorching van without food or drink, leaving one man so dehydrated one drank his own urine. G4S was ordered to pay a $500,000 fine. In 2008, an aboriginal man in G4S custody of died of heat stroke after being driven through the desert in a metal pod behind a prisoner van. It was so hot inside, the man was severely burned, where his skin touched the metal floor. G4S was fined $285,000.

Are such controversies relevant to the HUB tragedy? A transnational conglomerate can’t be held responsible for the alleged actions of one employee among 657,000. And no psychological screening process in the world can infallibly predict human behaviour. Yet this tragedy, fundamentally, is about one G4S employee accused of shooting four others. In a world where governments increasingly contract out police, prison and quasi-military services to for-profit companies, it’s worth asking how we ensure these guns-for-hire are fit to carry them and how we hold a corporation accountable when things go wrong.

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June 23, 2012 Posted by | ArmorGroup, Civilian Contractors, Contractor Oversight, Contractors Arrested, G4S, Private Security Contractor, Safety and Security Issues, Vetting Employees | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Whistleblower sacked after speaking out about G4S cutting corners when vetting security staff for the Olympics

From the people who brought you ArmorGroup Security at the US Embassy in Kabul 

Looks like they are using the same Vetting process they used to hire  Danny Fitzsimons as a security contractor who killed two fellow employees within hours of arriving on the job

  • Sarah Hubble was told not return after contacting the media about her experiences working for G4S
  • She says she had access to passport information, bank account details and national insurance cards but had not been vetted herself

The Daily Mail June 3, 2012

A whistleblower who claims staff cut corners while vetting security staff for the London Olympics was escorted from her place of work.

Data input clerk Sarah Hubble was interviewed by bosses, then told not to return after contacting the media about her experiences working for G4S.

Miss Hubble, 27, from Darlington, County Durham, claimed the system was creaking under the pressure of processing thousands of applications ahead of this summer’s games.

She said staff had to process a minimum of ten applications an hour and that the documents ended up piled in corners at the office in Stockton-on-Tees.

Please see the original and read more here

June 3, 2012 Posted by | ArmorGroup, Civilian Contractors, G4S, Private Security Contractor, Security Clearances, Vetting Employees | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Hang ‘Em in the Name of Blackwater, a Sign of Iraq’s Sovereignty

From CNN coverage of the ArmorGroup Danny Fitzsimons trial

The trial follows a U.S.-Iraq security agreement that went into effect in January 2009, ending foreign contractors’ immunity.

Before that, Iraqis had complained that private security contractors were operating in a state of lawlessness, never held accountable by Iraqi authorities for incidents in which Iraqis were killed.

The most famous such case involved a 2007 incident in which 17 Iraqis were killed in a Baghdad square by security guards working for Blackwater

At Fitzsimons’ trial Sunday was Hassan Jaber, an Iraqi lawyer who was wounded in the Blackwater shooting incident.

At one point during the proceedings, he whispered, “This is a victory for justice.”

After the trial, he told CNN he was very happy to see a British citizen being held accountable for a crime in Iraq, calling it a sign of Iraq’s sovereignty.

See Also Danny Fitzsimons and the Blackwater Backlash

January 23, 2011 Posted by | ArmorGroup, Blackwater, Civilian Contractors, Contractor Casualties, Contractor Oversight, G4S, Iraq, Legal Jurisdictions, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Private Security Contractor, Safety and Security Issues, State Department, Vetting Employees | , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Government Contractor in Iraq for seven years, Daniel Phillips, arrested for rape of young girl

Update:  Daniel was working for DRS Technologies formerly Tamsco.  He was working at a small satellite site at Joint Base Balad.

I want to know who this dirt bag has been working for in Iraq and how he was able to get past the “wants and warrants” check for a Common Access Card (CAC). I would also be interested to see how many times he R&R’d to SE Asian countries such as Thailand where you can just buy yourself a little girl!  MsSparky

WKTR TV 3

Norfolk police, with the assistance from the federal government, arrested a civilian government contractor that was wanted for the rape of a juvenile female relative between 2004 and 2005. The suspect fled to Iraq soon after the crime to avoid arrest and began working with computers as a government contractor.

Investigators began tracking the location of Daniel Phillips, age 46, in December of 2010. With the assistance of the federal government, Phillips was located in Iraq. Arrangements were made to fly Phillips to Kuwait and then Dulles International Airport in Northern Virginia.

Phillips arrived at Dulles Saturday morning. Norfolk Fugitive Investigators accompanied by U.S. Marshalls boarded the plane and took Phillips into custody without incident at approximately 7:15 a.m. He was returned to Norfolk and is currently in the Norfolk City Jail awaiting trial for rape, aggravated sexual battery, and indecent liberties with a child.  Please see the original here

Contractor Hid in Iraq for Seven Years over rape charge

Well, he didn’t stay there the whole time. A Virginia TV news crew caught up to a neighbor next door to Phillips’ Norfolk house. That neighbor, who identified herself only as Julie, suggested Phillips was a family man who’d traveled back to the US several times in recent years. “I see him only on occasion when he returns from overseas,” said the woman. “He’s always very supportive, a very nice, helpful neighbor.” Julie then added that she believed Phillips was married with six children.

The vetting process to become a contractor in Iraq varies from company to company, but it can be extremely thin. Once hired, these employees are supposed to go through a Contintental United States Replacement Center (CRC), an Army-run military processing facility such as this one in Ft. Benning, Georgia. There, they go through a weeklong medical and background screening, at the end of which they’re issued a microchipped military ID card and put on a military flight to their destination in Iraq, or Afghanistan, or wherever.

Additionally, when individual contractors in Iraq wish to take leave elsewhere, they must go through a thorough process to be manifested on a flight out—usually in a military aircraft—along with multiple military checks in which their ID card is scanned. (And when they leave their Iraq jobs, contractors must go through exacting procedures in Kuwait and the stateside CRC center yet again.)

But apparently, none of that kept Phillips from staying on as an Iraq contractor for seven years, with military-sanctioned vacation jaunts back to the States, all while authorities sought his arrest.

According to Sgt. Boe Bostjancic of the Norfolk Police Department, those authorities only caught scent of Phillips’ trail late last year, tracing him to Iraq through emails, faxes, and phone calls he’d made. At that point, the local cops solicited help from military investigators, the US Marshals, and the State Department.

“They were able to call back very very quickly, and said, ‘Well, we found him in a base in Iraq, you’re right,'” Bostjancic told reporters. “And they…red-flagged him and pulled his passport.”

There are plenty of questions in this case, such as: How many other criminal suspects are hiding out on US military bases overseas? And why was it so easy for a man like Phillips to slip through the safeguards that are in place? What company or companies did Phillips work for? And what did he do with the presumable pile of money he made over the past near-decade?

In any case, Phillips isn’t talking. He declined inquiries from reporters Tuesday from his Norfolk City Jail cell.

January 11, 2011 Posted by | Civilian Contractors, Government Contractor, Iraq, Legal Jurisdictions, Safety and Security Issues, Vetting Employees | , , , , , , , | 10 Comments